Yet another epoxy resin yellow-test sample panel

Here are some images from yet another ArtResin test sample.
panel labeled copy
I chose a number of the most common art materials in PURE WHITE to test the  non-yellow properties of this mix.

the formula is pretty darn good!

shelf life seems to hold up after 2 weeks unopened in a room that got lots of sun light.

The hardener looks light-light-light yellow, but probably the clearest I have seen.

Chemist arnt always painters or ‘artists’ (although they are super creative creators), and when we say ‘clear like water’ – we mean not even the tiniest bit of yellow.

panel on side copy

I am not settling for something that is not perfect, but I really think that this is the best we can get!!  we will continue to improve, but i think artresin will move forward with this formula.

Yellowing of resin has been an issue since it’s invention.  And everything always loses to the sun over time. I think we have something that will hold up pretty darn good.
ink marker
pencil crayon
conte
oil pastel
chalk pastel
encaustics
water color
gouache
acrylic
oil
spray paint

panel angle copy

posted by davezak in application,epoxy resin,test and have Comments Off

Equipment List

please visit our NEW site at www.ArtResin.com

ArtResin epoxy resin enlivens artwork of any medium.
Easily applied in liquid form, ArtResin quicky cures to a rock hard state with the look of clean, glossy glass. This surface application enriches color, seal in and provides a protective barrier, is heat and water resistant and forms an easy to clean attractive finish.
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Here are some of the supplies you may want to consider having on hand for your resin sessions.  Not all are mandatory, and after you use the resin a few times, you will discover the tools and materials that work best for your creative temperament.  Go get em!

Epoxy Resin and Hardener – essential!
Measuring Cups – save cottage cheese and yogurt containers! (sour cream containers work as well…)
Mixing Pot/Bucket – something larger to mix in
Disposable Brushes / Spreaders – key word here is ‘disposable’ – a brush may be more comfortable, but you will never get it clean.  If you use a spreader, you can wipe it off with paper towel and use it again and again.
Tape – You may want to tape off your edges.  This is not done often, and means more work because you need to finish the corners. There are only a few materials that you can peel off of resin including the backside of tape, plastic bags and other very smooth surfaces.
Safety Goggles – just be safe!


Mixing Sticks – something strong.  you can get great supplies at the dollar store.  Once used, you can also wipe the mixing stick off with paper towel and use it again.
Disposable Gloves – very important and makes clean up easier.  Also, the main health concern with epoxy resin is allergic reaction on your skin.  Over time, you can ‘grow’ these allergies if you keep getting the resin on your skin.  So wear gloves!
Foam Brushes – easy to spread with, but much like paint brushes, these will have to be thrown out after one resin session.
Dust Mask (Respirator) – the fumes can make you dizzy and depressed.  Again, just be safe.
Sand Paper - You may want to sand down high peaks if your painting is textures so that the paint will not stick through the resin (unless you want this effect – it could look neat)
Rags - this can get messy.  wear old clothes too!
Paper Towel – your best friend when using resin!


Blow Torch (or heat gun) – I swear by the blow torch for getting rid of bubbles… cannot recommend a better investment if you plan on using resin often.  Run the flame over the surface once leveled and watch the bubbles disappear!
Level - Epoxy Resin, like any liquid, will follow the path to the lowest point in the fight against gravity.  Before you pour, make sure your painting, and the surface/stand you are holding the painting on, is perfectly level in all directions.  A perfectly level painting will have a perfectly level resin finish!
Drop Cloth – if you care about your floor…  make sure to catch the drips.  Fabric drop cloths will soak up the resin vs. plastic which will leave the resin sitting on top…  If you walk on the drop cloth, it will be less messy to use cloth drop sheets so you don’t drag it around on the plastic.
Plastic Sheets (if you want to make a tent) - this can be very valuable and insure that you dont get dust on your art.  You can get these cheap in the paint section where they are sold for covering floors when painting walls.
Pigments - fun to experiment with, but definitely not essential.
A Good Attitude! – I find it helpful to wake up in the morning and tell myself, ‘today can be special’. try it! :P

If you have other materials or tricks, i would love to hear about them!  I am putting together a free ebook on using resin with art, and would love collaboration from other artists.

Thanks,

posted by davezak in application,epoxy resin,faq,tips and have Comments Off

TIP BOX: round 1

please visit our NEW site at www.ArtResin.com

ArtResin epoxy resin enlivens artwork of any medium.
Easily applied in liquid form, ArtResin quicky cures to a rock hard state with the look of clean, glossy glass. This surface application enriches color, seal in and provides a protective barrier, is heat and water resistant and forms an easy to clean attractive finish.
Spread the love!

DUST-WATER-TRICK

If you are working in a garage, or somewhere with a cement floor, wet the floor lightly.  Dust, hair and floating particles will stick to the floor and not get blown up as you walk around and end up on your art!

DON’T BE SCARED OF FIRE!

A blow torch is your best friend for a perfect finish.  Once you have poured your resin and it is spread out evenly, run a blow torch a few inches over the surface.  You will see the bubbles rise to the surface and burn away any particle or hair into smoke.  A blow torch can make your finish perfect (note: once you use the blow torch, don’t touch the resin again.  The surface will be partially cured and anything that you touch from this point on may show once cured.)

CHALK PASTELS, WATER BASED MARKERS AND NON-DRYING MEDIUMS

If your surface can smudge or run with liquids, use a spray varnish first over your art to seal it, so that the pigments of your non-dry/dusty medium will not mix with the resin!


SWITCH TO WOODEN ART BOARDS

Resin is heavy and can make your canvas sag in the middle.  You will have the best results if you paint on wooden/hard surfaces and are planning on finishing with a thick coat of ArtResin.

MOUNT PAPER ON WHITE

If you are resining over a collage, watercolour paper or mixed media with white/light coloured paper, you will want to mount the paper on a white surface.  The paper may turn slightly opaque, and if you are mounting on unpainted wood, for example, the paper may look browny… So paint your surface white!

WAIT A BIT LONGER IF YOU USE OILS

Oil based mediums MAY leave an oily surface on the top of the resin if the paint was not fully dry.  Sometime oils painting take weeks or months to actually be dry.  If you find an oily surface on your finished-resined painting, you can wash it off with dish-soap and warm water…


EXPERIMENT

Your second Resin job will be better than your first.  The third resin job will be even better.  Keep in mind that you may not get everything perfect your first try, and that the best way to learn is to make mistakes and improve!  Experiment :)

posted by davezak in faq,q and a,tips and have Comments Off

Q&A IV: working outdoors, guitar, drilling, spray paint and matte finishes

please visit our NEW site at www.ArtResin.com

ArtResin epoxy resin enlivens artwork of any medium.
Easily applied in liquid form, ArtResin quicky cures to a rock hard state with the look of clean, glossy glass. This surface application enriches color, seal in and provides a protective barrier, is heat and water resistant and forms an easy to clean attractive finish.
Spread the love!

Keep the emails coming!  Let’s fill the world with glossy art!

I need to work outside because of my small space, any tips tip for faster curing and working outside!!!!!!

Find a box top to fit over your project/painting, make sure it doesn’t touch. Paint your box top black to keep your project warm if curing in the sun. This will help with debris and yellowing

Resin cures faster in the heat…  So you may want to wait until the snow is gone.

My two questions are 1) Being that the surface of my guitar is rather small (a foot square at a guess), how much resin will I need? And 2) I am not sure exactly how I should do the edges. If I should mask them off and try to get a clean edge when the resin starts to dry, or if I should just let it drip down the sides and also coat the sides of the guitar. Thanks for your time.

1)  A 32 oz kit would give you more than enough resin! 2) I would paint the sides with resin.  work in multiple thin layers to avoid dripping.  Resin is close to the viscosity of honey, so imagine painting honey on your guitar at just the right thickness so that it will be thick, but not run down the side before it hardens.  Hope that helps!  post pictures!

Can I drill into the epoxy after it dries?
I’m doing 2 5ft by 3.5 ft paintings that need to be installed (no room for frame or back supports once mounted in wall.)
Can it b done?

I would just start with a small hole first: a tiny drill bit.  and work your way up so that it doesn’t crack.  Do not drill extremely close to the edge and maybe use a rubber washer with the screw.

I have never tried this, but Resin is used for boats, so I do not think it is unusual to drill into the surface at all!


I was wondering if you can resin over a gloss spray paint?

short answer… YES!
there isn’t much you can’t resin over! – it is like a mosquito trapped in amber…

try it!

If the material you are resining is oil based, you may want to let the oil dry longer so that it does not seep into the resin.

I watched a lot of your videos on youtube and I was wondering if you could help me with what i am trying to do!

I am mounting my photographs to wood blocks and i want there to be a 1/2 inch of acrylic or maybe its resin to go over it. I dont want it to be super shiny though. I tried Acrylic gel semi-gloss but it came out too streaky and not thick enough.

Acrylic mediums are VERY different from Epoxy Resin.

I would compare an acrylic medium to drying craft glue, and Epoxy Resin to glass.
Epoxy resin really does NOT come matte… it is always glossy.. BUT don’t worry!  what you can do it apply the glossy resin, and then you have 3 options to make it  a matte finish.

1. take a VERY FINE finishing sand paper to the surface of the resin…  buff OUT the shine!
2. spray a non-gloss varnish from a can over the surface (may be the easiest)
3. paint over as smooth as you can with a non gloss acrylic medium…

You will find that the resin will really stay clear and let you get the thickness that you want!
I hope this helps :)  It will be a bit of experimenting.

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Great stick around for more resin Q&A and sign up for our newsletter.

happy art :)

posted by davezak in application,art,artists,blog,faq,q and a and have Comments Off

Q&A III: Pigments, Outdoor Rocks, Bubbles and Taking Photos

please visit our NEW site at www.ArtResin.com

ArtResin epoxy resin enlivens artwork of any medium.
Easily applied in liquid form, ArtResin quicky cures to a rock hard state with the look of clean, glossy glass. This surface application enriches color, seal in and provides a protective barrier, is heat and water resistant and forms an easy to clean attractive finish.
Spread the love!

Below are questions from 4 more artists who are experimenting with ArtResin on their work.  Hope these help!  Keep playing :)
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PIGMENTS

Q: What is the coloured medium that you can pour ontop of wet resin to create a watercolour effect?
Do i mix it with anything before pouring it onto the resin? I have experimented with all mediums and i thought pouring coloured ink onto wet resin would work but when it dry’s i get a crater effect from the ink and nothing like a polished watercolour effect. HELP.
A: Have many pots of resin mixed at the same time with different colored pigments in them…  There are pigments available for resin: both opaque and transparent

simple?
simple!

I have used ink with resin and did not get craters…  strange.  Ink has a very cool reaction with resin.  You can pour the resin on wet ink, or pout the ink into the resin.  Very neat effect!

STONES

Q: can we use epoxy resin on soft stone/ stone and on wall and secondly
can we use this art for outdoor purposes.
A: now, resin on stone is fine.  a great idea.  Will really bring out the natural colours of the stone… similar to applying a glaze. as for outdoor use.  This is fine.  Remember, resin is also used on the bottom of boats!  it is very durable.  ONE THING to consider – resin will yellow over time, especially when exposed to UV light…  there are resins that are UV resistant.  consider this option!

good luck :)


BUBBLES

Q: isn’t there a high risk of fire or explosion using a blowtorch with the resin to hit rid of bubbles? Isn’t the resin flammable?

A: no, the resin isn’t flammable.. is is toxic (fumes) – and corrosive… the worst part of the resin (part B – hardener) is that you get allergic to it over time if it continues to get on your skin.

if you are worried about using a blow torch, get a heat gun!  that is what i use.  works great.  I got one for $19 from the hardware store…  gets sticky though :P

TAKING PHOTOS

Q: I am trying to photograph my art work and was wondering the epoxy resin finish will effect the photographs since its like glass. Is there anyway for me to avoid the glare or shoud . I photograph before i put the finish on. What do you do ?

A: just try and have ‘area’ light, like a semi cloudy day outside.

professional art photography would have a white tent with light shining on the outsides, with the painting on the insides…

sometimes i find you just need to continue to adjust your lights and the angle of the piece until you get a good shot without glare.

or, if you know how… photograph darker, and adjust levels and colour in photoshop.

__

awesome stuff going on the art world.  Please share your Resin experiences with us!


posted by davezak in application,art,artists,blog,faq,q and a and have Comments Off

Qs: second coats, scratches, matte finishes and paper!

please visit our NEW site at www.ArtResin.com

ArtResin epoxy resin enlivens artwork of any medium.
Easily applied in liquid form, ArtResin quicky cures to a rock hard state with the look of clean, glossy glass. This surface application enriches color, seal in and provides a protective barrier, is heat and water resistant and forms an easy to clean attractive finish.
Spread the love!

Questions from other lovely artists. Round 2!

i’m wondering if it is possible to apply a second coat of epoxy when the first coat did not go on evenly? there are areas on the painting( which are large acrylic on plywood) where the epoxy seems to have pulled away and left a blotchy, uneven appearance…wondering if applying a second coat would fill in the areas that are lacking epoxy and how would i do that?


you will be fine!  second coats cover up many-a-imperfection. you can even scratch the first surface and sand it…  removing the gloss and making the surface appear white.  The second coat will go over the first and be perfectly clear.

You may want to sand the surface to give the second layer something to hold onto, and clean it with window cleaner or alcohol to be perfect.

The second coat will have to be thick to fill in the divets and make a smooth cover of the whole piece.


so u mean just sand it down enough to make it rough to apply epoxy? or all the way to the paint?
if it’s scratchy looking( the first layer sanded) will that appear when i apply the second coat?

just sand to make it rough. not all the way at all!  and the scratchy look of the first layer WILL GO AWAY when you apply the second coat.  promise!

Is there something you can do to make a matte or textured surface with epoxy resin?

yes!  for a matte surface – use the black, fine finishing sandpaper to take off the gloss… OR paint on a matte acrylic medium or spray matte varnish. SECOND, for a textured surface, after your first coat of epoxy, use a rag to apply the second one.  this looks great, AND covers up imperfections.  I have done this on a bunch of my pieces.  good question :)


I have watched some of your videos on Youtube and checked out your website. I am curious, I have used resin before on paintings, but I have recently incorporated paper (pages from books, etc) into my art. I am tenative to resin these pieces for fear of how it will react with the paper. I have heard that sometimes applying resin to a piece with paper will make the paper opaque. Is this something I need to worry about, or have you had any experience with this?

first, if you pour resin on plain white paper, it will not soak into the paper.. you can touch the bottom of the page and it will not be wet… BUT it will look wet on the top.
this being said, I have resined TONS of mixed media pieces.  all of my painting are paper glued onto the canvas and painted over…

I have also resined over paper… and have learned the hard way that you must have a white surface in behind.  the paper does get slightly transparent, but if you have a white surface you do not notice.
I had a friend over a few weeks ago who does water colour.. we mounted the paper on board painted white and resined over the watercolour paper.  it looks excellent.

really you need to just experiment, but a good tip is to mount on a white surface…

___________________

There you go!
contact me if you have any questions that you can’t find in the videos, FAQ or on this blog! :)
Happy Art :)

~love davezak

posted by davezak in application,art,artists and have Comments Off

Recent Epoxy Resin Art Email Q&A!

please visit our NEW site at www.ArtResin.com

ArtResin epoxy resin enlivens artwork of any medium.
Easily applied in liquid form, ArtResin quicky cures to a rock hard state with the look of clean, glossy glass. This surface application enriches color, seal in and provides a protective barrier, is heat and water resistant and forms an easy to clean attractive finish.
Spread the love!

Having ArtResin has been really great because of all the artists I have had the chance to chat with from all around the world.  Artists have emailed about epoxy resin from India, Chile, Korea, Australia, and all over Europe and America.  There have been visits to this site from over 100 countries!  Send me a ‘hello’ with a picture of your art, and I will post it here with a link to your site and resined-art!

“Artists love other artists” ~Julia Cameron, The Artist’s Way

Here are a few recent questions from artists about using Epoxy Resin on their art:

_______________________________

I was wondering what your thoughts are on reusing mixture cups and the pour cup you use for art resin. Does the next batch you mix and pour in previous cups affect the makeup of the resin at all? LET ME know what you think. I just poured my 1st piece and it came out great!

Todd,  I wipe out the mixing cups with paper towel right away while wtill wet.. and reuse them many times…  trying to clean with water or chemicals is a pain…  you use tons of paper towel, but i have been doing this for years!

Don’t know if I mentioned to you, but I started using a heat gun after pouring the resin.. it is amazing for getting rid of bubble simply.. best surface i have done yet.  flawless.

great,
happy art


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1) Many drying oils, such as linseed, penetrate deep into the fibers of unprimed canvas causing the cotton to rot eventually. Would epoxy resin have a similar effect?
Epoxy encases.  I would compare it to a mosquito caught in amber.  Also, if you pour resin on plain paper… it is wet on the top, but does not soak into the paper.. you can touch the bottom of the paper and it is dry.  unlike an oil, resin turns into a solid.  I would not worry about rotting canvas.. I would be more concerned with yellowing over time.

2) A number of companies make varnishes that reflect UV light. Would it be advantageous to mix some of this in with the wet resin? Paint a thin layer on top?
I have talked with other artists that apply UV protectants on top… again, the concern here is yellowing.. UV light is resins worst enemy.  It does not hurt to use as much UV protectant as possible if you have some at your disposal.  If this brings any reief, I have some art pieces from over 5 years ago that are still crystal clear.. even over the white parts!

3) I’ve experimented with mixing some additives with the wet epoxy to give it different handling characteristics: beeswax, impasto painting medium, etc, etc. Any suggestions?
experiment.  I have mixed in acrylic paints, pigments, inks… my purpose for mixing was aesthetic, not altering properties. sorry i had a hard time with chemistry in school.  There are answers out there!

4) Anything I might add to slow down the pot time?
keep temperatures cooler…  or buy a product with a longer pot life!  will take some research.  these guys seem very helpful and know their stuff:  www.systemthree.com (boat epoxy supplier)


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Can I use this same product if I want to cast an object in a block of resin? Or do I need another type of product? By the way, I LOVE your very helpful site and products! Thanks

you may want to investigate polyester resin.. as opposed to pigments.  Polyester resin is used for casting.. mold making.

epoxy resin tends to get cloudy when you start  very thick applications…  I suppose it would work, depending on the size of the block you wanted to make…

look at this product and ones like it:   http://www.eti-usa.com/consum/castresn/castresn.htm#easy

_______________________________

Did you ever finish the tree stump? How much resin did it take? I have a 10 foot, old and dried carved log piece and am wondering how to estimate for coverage…

I have done 2 coats of the tree stump.

first coat I used a gallon!!!! what a waste!  it just soaked into the wood and didnt look like I did anything.  so I would spray the wood first with varnish or something that will make the outside hard and not like a sponge!…

really tough to estimate.  the stump I am doing has another big crack that just eats up the resin.  I’d expect to use a few gallons…

looking wicked though.  I will need to do a third coat, and maybe a forth on mine because it is painted on the sides and not as thick as when it sits on the top, level surface…


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So there are a few questions coming from artists around the world!
Browse through the ever-expanding resin FAQ for other helpful suggestions
happy art!
posted by davezak in application,art,artists,faq and have Comments Off