Research vs. creative process

Research vs. creative process

Scholarly work is widely regarded today to include that which is creative in nature. This post, taken from my online Comprehensive Portfolio at www.rebeccazak.com, explains the rationale for this.

.    The Brock University Faculty Association Collective Agreement (2008; and others like it) supports the use of creative work as evidence of meaningful scholarly activity in a faculty member’s application for tenure or promotion. This is very fitting, because upon comparison of the research process (Creswell, 2011) and the creative process (Ministry of Education and Training, 2009) in the two diagrams below, it becomes clear that the two bear a striking resemblance (please click to view clearly):

researchvscreative-color-rebecca-zak (2)

.    In each case, a problem/challenge/question is established by the researcher or artist. Then the researcher/artist draws on prior knowledge (his or her own/others’) in order to articulate what it is he or she intends to do with regard to the problem. Next, he or she gets to work, gathering data (this can take a variety of forms, from numerical to artistic). In both cases, what follows is a period of examining the data, finalizing them, and presenting/sharing them with an audience. The qualitative research process and the creative process are indeed so similar, Bates (2011) recognizes them as one and the same—and I agree with his observation. I developed the following chart as a visual reinforcement to show the many connections that exist between these two processes. The language on the chart has been borrowed from Creswell (2011, p. 8) and the Ontario Art Curriculum (Ministry of Education and Training, 2009, pp. 21–22) to explicate each step within either process. It is also important to note, as mentioned in the Art Curriculum document (Ministry of Education and Training, 2009), that “the creative process is intended to be followed in a flexible, fluid, and cyclical manner. Students . . . are able to move deliberately and consciously between the stages and to vary their order as appropriate”  (p. 20); this may allow for a more seamless overlap with the research process (please click to view clearly):

Screen Shot 2013-07-30 at 12.57.54 PM

References

Bates, P. (2011, 07 15). Interview by R. Zak.
.
Brock University (2008). Faculty Association collective agreement.
.
.     St. Catharines, Canada: Brock University.
.
Creswell, J. W. (2011). Educational research: Planning,
.
.    conducting, and evaluating quantitative and qualitative
.
.    research (4th ed.). Toronto, Canada: Pearson Education.
.
Ministry of Education and Training. (2009). The Ontario.
.
.    curriculum grades 1-8: The arts. Ottawa, Canada: Queen’s Printer
.
.    for Ontario.

Posted by Rebecca Zak

Categorised under creative work, methodology
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