Collective Intelligence/Inclusion

Collective Intelligence/Inclusion

The methodology behind Raising Creativity involves mining the “collective intelligence” (Jenkins, 2006) of YouTube for relevant clips that can be remixed together to form a cohesive illuminated response to the question of how creativity can be nurtured in education. In this blog I consider the merits of paying attention to multiple voices through the lens of “collective intelligence” and inclusion

   In the video below, Henry Jenkins (as cited in TEDxTalks, 2010) discusses “participatory culture” and how it plays out, particularly amongst young people in a 21st century context. He notes that young people are often active social agents capable of taking on considerable responsibility and will do so especially in areas of personal interest (and I would add, using methods of interest). He advocates that these interests must be taken seriously and that spaces are needed to support such pursuits. Participatory websites (i.e., social media) fulfill this need by offering accessible, user-friendly platforms for engagement and dissemination. Video-enabled cell phones are now incredibly ubiquitous, making YouTube a popular vehicle for communicating and for generating or adopting community around a given interest or cause (Godin as cited in TEDtalksDirector, 2009). It may therefore be now more appropriate  to say “video is mightier than the sword.”
.    From an unschooling perspective, participatory culture fosters play, experimentation, ownership, entrepreneurialism, passion, political identity, and integrity, all of which add up to rich educational opportunity. If ultimately what we want education to do is produce competent critical thinkers who can articulately contribute their thoughts and ideas, then many scholars and other education stakeholders (unschoolers or otherwise) would agree that the Web 2.0 technology available today (e.g., YouTube) can certainly effectively aid in that quest (Hoechsmann & Poyntz, 2012; Jenkins as cited in TEDxTalks, 2010).
.    Ultimately what I want this research to accomplish is (a) to highlight informal learning models and (b) to underscore the importance of creativity, particularly in young people. Therefore it is obvious to me that the voices of young people must be represented within my selection. I had always intended to include the voice of scholars in my work, since the plan for this video-based research originated from the traditional dissertation model in which scholars are routinely referenced. After considering the diversity implicit in the term “collective intelligence” however, it became clear that to reference only scholars was both narrow sighted and exclusive. To ignore young voices for whom this research is aimed and whose educational reality it attempts to transform, especially when it is they who can speak anecdotally from the front line, would be inconsiderate and inappropriate to say the least. Instead, I hope to “[honour] silenced voices in a world of multiple realities” (Fleet, 2008, p. 265). Voice is our means of emancipation (Freire, 1970); I will not deny that which I aim to foster.

.    “If the structure does not permit dialogue the structure must be changed” (Freire, 1970).

.    As mentioned, in the video below Henry Jenkins explains his concepts of collective intelligence and participatory culture, in detail.

 

References

Fleet, A. (2008). Re-becoming a supervisor: Extending possibilities. In J. G. Knowles,
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.       S. Promislow, & A. L. Cole (Eds.), Creating scholartistry: Imagining the
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       arts-informed thesis or dissertation (pp. 261–278). Halifax, Canada: Backalong Books.
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Freire, P. (1970). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York, NY: Continuum.
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Hoechsmann, M., & Poyntz, S. R. (2012). Media literacies: A critical introduction.
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.      West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
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Jenkins, H. (2006). Convergence culture: Where old and new media collide.
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.       New York: New York University Press.
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TEDtalksDirector. (2009, May 11). Seth Godin: The tribes we lead. Retrieved
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.       June 7, 2013, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uQGYr9bnktw
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TEDxTalks. (2010, April 13). TEDxNYED – Henry Jenkins – 03/06/10. Retrieved
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.       June 7, 2013, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFCLKa0XRlw

Posted by Rebecca Zak

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