Part 2 (literature review) is live!

Part 2 (literature review) is live!

The second instalment of my five-part video series is complete and now live! This instalment of Raising Creativity constitutes the literature review of my research-based documentary.

      Just as in a traditional dissertation, this second “chapter” of my multimodal dissertation provides a comprehensive overview of what others have said with regard to the topic of the importance of creativity in education. I begin with a discussion that breaks down what creativity is and how it happens (i.e., the creative process) and where discovery fits in to this. Then, I discuss the link between creativity and intrinsic motivation, cognitive psychology, higher order thinking, and holism in order to build the case for the necessity of nurturing creativity.
.    Ultimately my desired outcome of this research is for it to bring about change, anywhere from an individual level to a policy level. After all, arts-informed educational research seeks to be essentially transformative in nature (Knowles, Promislow, & Cole, 2008). I believe that change will transpire only if and when people feel strongly enough to be moved into action; therefore I see my duty here as an artist/researcher/teacher to exploit the multimodal medium of video for that purpose. I aim for the heart, whether it be through catchy music that seduces the audience to keep listening, or the attractive colour palette of bright yellow, hot pink and black that unifies the piece and pleases the eye from scene to scene, or the crescendoing sound of a heartbeat reminding the audience that the matter at hand references real human lives and is therefore critical, or the shameless shots of an innocent little girl running and playing happily alongside Sir Ken Robinson’s voiceover powerfully asserting that we “rethink the fundamental principles on which we’re educating our children . . . and the only way we’ll do it is by seeing our creative capacities for the richness they are, and by seeing our children for the hope that they are” (Robinson as cited in Raising Creativity, 2013). By the time the credits roll, I hope to have influenced the audience enough that they will be motivated (as a first step) to participate in any of my calls to action (i.e., “share this with a friend,” “please add your thoughts by posting a comment,” “watch the rest of the videos”). Dissemination and participation are the first steps toward a transformative outcome (Wells, 2008), and I believe the degree to which both of these are achieved will be correlational to the affective sensibility I am able to evoke in the presentation.
     Here it is, Part 2 of Raising Creativity:

References

Knowles, J. G., Promislow, S., & Cole, A. L. (2008). Creating
.
.     scholartistry: Imagining the arts-informed thesis or
.
.     dissertation. Halifax, Canada: Backalong Books.
.
Raising Creativity. (2013, November 7). Raising creativity
.
.    (part 2/5): Lit review.
Retrieved November 7, 2013,
.
.    from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-2vkZjeMFY

Wells, K. (2008). Researching queer: Showing, telling, and
.
.    theorizing. In J. G. Knowles, S. Promislow, & A. L. Cole (Eds.),
.
.    Creating scholartistry: Imagining the arts-informed
.
.    thesis or dissertation (pp. 121–134). Halifax, Canada: Backalong Books.

 

Posted by Rebecca Zak

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