First video (rationale) is live!

First video (rationale) is live!

In this post, I’m very pleased to present the first of five videos in the Raising Creativity series/polyptych, part one of my research documentary.

.    Since the five videos I have proposed are meant to cover the same content as one would find in a traditional five chapter dissertation, this video is an introduction to my intended research. In it, I essentially explain the issue I’m focusing on and provide a rationale for my investigation. To sum it up, this video contextualizes the importance of creativity including its role in learning, and establishes the idea that mainstream schooling is not adequately fostering it. I then present my research question, “How can we nurture creativity in education?” and follow that up with subquestions surrounding alternative educational models. Finally, I use this video to also introduce myself and present my personal narrative of me as artist/researcher/teacher to establish credibility for the viewer and explain why I care about this issue so passionately. In so doing, I also plug art-making as a method of inquiry, which will be further explicated in my third video, on methodology.
.    The challenge with writing multimodally as I am doing (i.e. making a video) is that the piece must be cohesive and comprehensive, yet also concise. There is never any shortage of content; rather my challenge is that there is always a chance that the final piece will be unwatchable if I do not keep a keen eye toward clever editing. Finding the balance between presenting enough and not presenting too much means everything to each video’s efficacy. For this reason, I am planning to be flexible artistically in terms of what content fits where, in order to minimize redundancy, aid the flow of each piece, and bridge the video sections so they read as one unit and keep the viewer interested in watching on. All of this said, I feel there are plenty of engaging ideas that surface in this first video–both content-wise and in terms of design themes and motifs–to draw viewers in and captivate their attention.
.    A second challenge to working with digital mashup, which O’Brien and Fitzgerald (2006) define as “a visual remix, commonly a video or website which remixes and combines content from a number of different sources to produce something new and creative” (p. 1), is that sometimes the quotation excerpts I assemble  alongside one another do not fit precisely well together at first. Occasionally there occurs a grammatical disagreement that would be easily amended with block parenthesis if I were using text alone, but which I have chosen to overlook given the video medium because it tends to be forgiving of such disagreements. More frequently a speaker makes an important point in a video that I wish to utilize, but in their quote they do not use a specific pronoun (instead replacing pronouns with “it,” “they,” etc.) which renders the context of what they are saying not completely clear. In this instance, I have tried to edit their quotation by taking a snippet from somewhere else in the video where the speaker says the pronoun to which they refer indirectly later on and inserting it where it makes sense to create a coherent, usable sentence that meets my needs. At times the flow and intonation of the speaker’s voice is rendered slightly incompatible when I do this (not to mention there can be a slight jumpiness to the speaker visually), however I do not mind; I am not attempting to hide the fact that that is how I have troubleshot the adaptation of visual quotations for my purposes. In every case, I have ensured that the original context in which the quote appeared has remained intact so as to preserve the integrity of the quote and of my research.
.    Without any further ado, here is Part 1 of Raising Creativity:

 

References

O’Brien, D. & Fitzgerald, B. (2006). Mashups, remixes and copyright law. Internet Law Bulletin, 9(2),
.
.      pp. 17–19.
.
Raising Creativity. (2013, May 27). Raising creativity (part 1/5): Rationale. Retrieved May 27, 2013,
.
.      from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GxYUBM0efso

Posted by Rebecca Zak

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