Winter 2013 update

Winter 2013 update

It’s December 2013, and the progress continues. In this post I will review what has been done since my summer update as well as what is left to do.

.     Early November saw the release of my second video in the Raising Creativity (2013) series, comprising my literature review. This video is 13 minutes long, heavy in content, and moves quickly. It is also heavy in motion graphics (i.e., animation) that add interest and help bring concepts to life through multimodality (e.g., the side-by-side animated brains that illustrate Freire’s notion of banking education versus problem-posing education; the animated diagram illustrating Csikszentmihalyi’s concept of “Flow”; etc.). Because there was so much involved in the production of this video, I felt a huge sense of accomplishment and relief when it was finally completed, uploaded, and live. But what was really exciting was what happened after that point . . .
.     Like other scholars (Cohen, 2010; Smith as cited in FedCanada, 2012; Wells, 2008), I have long argued for the necessity of wide dissemination in (my) research, which was one of the main reasons I wanted to produce my dissertation in video format. Once Part 2 was uploaded to YouTube, I shared it on Facebook and Google+ as well as with my 1500+ YouTube subscribers. The video’s views accumulated quickly by means of these networks (including the extended networks of those in my networks), and within a month it had received roughly 8,000 views. This was and is so exciting to me because it demonstrates the model is working as expected.  To be clear, these metrics are of viewership, not of transformative change in and of itself, which is the ultimate purpose I seek as an art-based researcher (Knowles, Promislow, & Cole, 2008). Viewership however is the first essential step in the process (Wells, 2008). Not only have people been watching, they’ve also been participating by liking the video (which notifies their network, thereby contributing to the buzz around the video) and by posting written comments under where the video is played. For example, Mary Beth Colman (2013) writes, “Some teachers are brave enough and committed enough to take the time to provide the learning environment necessary to nurture creativity; are school boards willing to support them with resources and $$$$$$$?????” Doug Stratford (2013) writes, “You’re right. We really need to rethink this. It is important.” And, Annie Bowker (2013) writes, “this video is awesome!! . . . I feel inspired to create.” Some have even responded to other respondents in dialogue with one another, which means altogether that this video has become a catalyst for conversation: another crucial step towards transformation (Freire, 1970). I am spurred on by this success seen so far.
.     Meanwhile, I have continued to blog (I am up to 27 posts now) and have reworked my original script for part 3 for conciseness. YouTube clips are in place, and filming for my narration will likely begin in January. All this, and I would be remiss if I did not note one big update of a personal nature since August: I’m pregnant. This is an important detail deserving of mention because of the fact that my research is naturally so reflexive; it stands to reason that having a child of my own will impact my perspective in multiple ways, and indeed I can sense that it is already shifting. Now the outcome of my research will not just affect my own teaching practice and have transformative potential for my viewership, but eventually my own child tooThis knowledge has deepened my commitment to this research in a new way . . . and she’s not even born yet! I expect to blog another update in the spring, when hopefully I can say I am seeing the light at the end of the dissertation tunnel.

 

 References

Bowker, A. (2013). [Facebook comment]. Retrieved December 10, 2013,
.
.      from https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=504114629
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Cohen, D. (2010, May 27). [Web log message]. Retrieved from http://
.
.      www.dancohen.org/
2010/05/27/open-access-publishing-and-scholarly-values/
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Colman, M.B. (2013). [YouTube comment]. Retrieved December 10, 2013,
.
.      from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-2vkZjeMFY
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FedCanada. (2012, May 27). Sidonie Smith: Towards a sustainable humanities.
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.      Retrieved December 10, 2013, from.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LcMSqrBYp8Y
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Freire, P. (1970). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York, NY: Continuum.
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Knowles, J. G., Promislow, S., & Cole, A. L. (2008). Creating scholartistry: Imagining the
.
.      arts-informed thesis or dissertation. Halifax, Canada: Backalong Books.

Raising Creativity. (2013, November 7). Raising creativity (part 2/5): Lit review.

.      Retrieved December 10, 2013, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-2vkZjeMFY
.
Stratford, D. (2013). [Facebook comment]. Retrieved December 10, 2013, from
.
     https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=504114629
.
Wells, K. (2008). Researching queer: Showing, telling, and theorizing. In J. G. Knowles,
.
.      S. Promislow, & A. L. Cole (Eds.), Creating scholartistry: Imagining the
.
.      arts-informed thesis or dissertation (pp. 121–134). Halifax, Canada: Backalong Books.

 

Posted by Rebecca Zak

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